Uncategorized

Living in “The Zone”

It’s a rainy day and I am doing all the things that have to be done for Christmas to happen at our house.

The tree is decorated. The bows are tied. The Santa collection is out.

And, there are boxes of greenery, lights, and Nativity sets that need to go somewhere…

Or, do they?

After my post on what I learned last year at Christmas, I’m trying to reconsider what is necessary.

Do I need to put those twinkling lights everywhere?

Does every room in the house need something?

Today, as I look at the heaping boxes and the long “to do” list I have, the answer is no.

I spent half the morning looking for the black and white striped wrapping paper I saw on Pinterest.

Finally, I looked at the clock and thought of my last blog post.

Really?

With a list of things to do that keeps getting longer and rolls of wrapping paper in the basement, why have I spent the last 30 minutes searching for more wrapping paper?

Wrapping paper
Wrapping paper (Photo credit: Heart for Japan)

Do I have to have the black and white striped paper with the green ribbons?

Clearly, no.

But, it would look fantastic and be so Pinterest-worthy.

To keep myself in line, I watched this video clip from the movie “Hitch” to remind myself of “My Christmas Zone.”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Py5qAH7wELY

Cover of "Hitch (Widescreen Edition)"
Cover of Hitch (Widescreen Edition)

When Albert starts busting his out-of-control dance moves, Hitch stops him, and says, “Don’t ever do that again! You hear me? …This is where you live, right here.”

Then he teaches him a simple back and forth move, nothing fancy, just a basic cool sway.

“This is where you live. This is home!” he says.

For this holiday season, I’m trying to get that live-in-the-zone concept.

Staying in this zone is the key to getting through the holiday season without regrets.

So, no more out-of-control moves.

I will not spend any more time looking for that sumptuous wrapping paper…but if I’m out, and I happen to see it, I will buy it because it will mean I “happened upon it” and it was “meant to be.”

And happening upon things that were meant to be is definitely in my holiday zone.

That is like divine intervention instead of foolish excess.

Wouldn’t you agree?

And, divine intervention is definitely in my Christmas zone.

I mean, that is the point of the holiday, right?

Even on something as seemingly silly as wrapping paper.

I won’t waste time searching for it, but with all the time I will save from not over-decorating, I might be able to find it…

christmas 2007
 (Photo credit: paparutzi)
Uncategorized

Christmas Wisdom

Last year after Christmas, I wrote a list of things to remember for this Christmas.

christmas 2007
(Photo credit: paparutzi)

Today I pulled it out to remind myself what to watch out for this Christmas:

1. Don’t get sucked into the world’s view of Christmas. Christmas will never be cinema-land perfect and trying to make it that way will just end up making you feel exhausted and disappointed.

2. Don’t over decorate. Just because it looks Christmasy, doesn’t mean it needs to be displayed.

3. Don’t overeat. Have a plan for getting through the holidays without gaining weight.

4. Remember “stuff” fades, memories last.

5. Some people won’t have a gift to unwrap at Christmas. Think about who they are and give them a wrapped gift.

6. Some people need groceries. Put a bag on someone’s porch or place a grocery store gift card in their mailbox anonymously.

7. Give people fruit, a waffle mix, a chicken pot pie or some new dish towels instead of sugary treats.

Chicken Pot Pie
Chicken Pot Pie (Photo credit: Renée S.)

Golden peanut brittle ready to enjoy.

8. Remember that on Christmas morning, there will be a lot of crumpled wrapping paper, empty boxes, and ribbons and a few small piles of what, in the end, is just stuff.  Everyone will take their stuff, assimilate it with their other stuff, and it will become ordinary in a matter of minutes. What will linger will be the moments of closeness, laughter, and the time we took to remember why we celebrate Christmas in the first place.

Change, From my Bookshelf, Memoir, Uncategorized

Bulletproof

Have you ever done something you thought was brave and exciting, and then recoiled in regret because you felt like an exposed nerve?

Mel Brooks “High Anxiety” movie comes to mind.

High Anxiety
High Anxiety (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I experienced this kind of high anxiety a couple of months ago when I sent query letters to literary agents.

I stepped into an unknown arena to try something new.

The minute I hit the send button, I seriously had a seismic panic attack.

Every flaw in the book suddenly flashed in my mind in glaring high-resolution.

Laurie, what were you thinking? The story arc wasn’t strong enough; it covers too much time; it’s too personal, and not nearly dramatic enough. Seriously woman, what were you thinking? Call every agent that expressed interest and tell them ‘never mind.’ Tell them to forget it. You hit ‘send’ too soon and you need to spend the next several days contacting agents and apologize for wasting their time.’

I yearned for a reset button that could erase the entire day and every last email.

Doug stared at me, baffled by my anxiety, especially because many agents expressed interest and wanted to see either parts of or the entire manuscript.

“Isn’t this what you’ve always wanted?” he asked, totally perplexed by my racing pulse.

Yes, and no, I thought.<;/em

I didn't realize how desperately vulnerable I would feel having so many agents reading and critiquing a manuscript I knew wasn't perfect. And, I couldn't control anything after I hit that "send" button.

They could hate the book, detest my writing, criticize my family, my religion, me, my life, my values, and everything from my sentence structure to my hair color.

Everything that matters to me was on the line. Talk about an epic fail!

Brené Brown, the author of Dare Greatly, calls these feelings of embarrassment and regret, "vulnerability hangovers."

When I stumbled upon her book and read that description, I immediately glommed on it.

(If you haven't heard of Brené Brown, check out this speech. http://www.ted.com/talks/brene_brown_on_vulnerability.html)

English: Photo of Brene Brown
English: Photo of Brene Brown (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The book title, “Daring Greatly,” comes from Theodore Roosevelt’s speech, “Citizens in a Republic,” given in 1910.

“It is not the critic that counts, not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming, but who does actually strive to do the deeds, who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions, who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the triumph of high achievement, fails, at least fails while daring greatly.”

Writing a book and taking the first step toward getting it published was my attempt to “dare greatly.

In the book, Brown asks, “How do we learn to embrace our vulnerabilities and imperfections so that we can engage in our lives from a place of authenticity and worthiness?

23 - Brene Brown quote
23 – Brene Brown quote (Photo credit: justmalia)

I wish I knew the answer to that question.

She wrote that, “vulnerability is not weakness, and the uncertainty, risk, and emotional exposure we face every day are not optional. Our only choice is a question of engagement. Our willingness to own and engage with our vulnerability determines the depth of our courage and the clarity of our own purpose; the level to which we protect ourselves from being vulnerable is a measure of our fear and disconnection.”

If we go through life trying to protect ourselves from feeling vulnerable, what do we get?

If we don’t take some chances, we end up with very little that really matters to us.

Are you daring to fail greatly?
Are you daring to fail greatly? (Photo credit: Chris Pirillo)

If we can’t love because we’re afraid of being hurt, won’t write because we might get rejected; or refuse to go for the job we really want, or not run the race because we might come in last, we are living in a place of fear.

We might believe we are choosing to feel safe, but we are really choosing to live a life void of passion, energy, and exhilaration.

After giving myself this little “be strong, have courage, try things” pep talk, my anxieties have mellowed. My vulnerability hangover has eased. My perspective is clearer. I still wish I had hired a professional editor to help me strengthen that story arc, but I’ve gathered my senses again.

I love Brown’s comment that, “Perfect and bulletproof are seductive, but they don’t exist in the human experience. We must walk out into the arena! We must dare to show up and let ourselves be seen. This is vulnerability. This is daring greatly.”

Thank you Brené Brown for helping me see that writing a book, sending it to agents, receiving rejections and suggestions for improvement do not add up to failure, but represent my effort to walk into the arena, show up, let myself be seen, and dare greatly. And, I know what I need to do better in case I ever try again.

How are you daring greatly? I’d love to know!

Community, From the News, Religion, Uncategorized

Overwhelmed by the Goodness of Others

Last Friday, President Scott Wheatley, our church’s leader over the area from Vienna to Herndon, Virginia and everything in between, wondered what we could do as a community to help the Hurricane Sandy victims in New York and New Jersey.

President Scott Wheatley with Sharon Bulova, Chairman of the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors

He contacted Kevin Calderwood, a church member from Reston who is now serving as a mission president in the New York South Mission of the church, overseeing 200 LDS missionaries. President Calderwood quickly responded and said the people there needed warm clothing, blankets and coats.

We sent out the word last Saturday that these good people needed our help.

I sent an email out to my neighbors, and other members of our congregations in this Northern Virginia area did the same. We also invited some of our church members in surrounding areas to join us by bringing clothing items and gift cards in $25 increments to help our missionaries buy food because they have depleted their own funds eating out. They can’t get back to their own homes for meals and they are spending all their waking hours hauling furniture out of homes and helping people one house at a time.

Local bishops announced an “Emergency Gifts of the Heart” donation event to be held at one of our buildings the next day. One couple in Frederick, Maryland immediately left the church, rallied their neighbors and joined other church members, packing up vans, trucks and a long trailer they towed to Oakton, Virginia because they felt the urgency of the call to help.

On Monday afternoon, the day before the election, when I showed up at the donation site, Stuart and Trina Neel, who organize a similar non-emergency “Gifts of the Heart” event like this twice a year, were busy putting up signs to direct cars through an efficient drive-thru where donors could drive up, drop off their donations and exit the parking lot. Our church members know this drill extremely well after participating in it for at least the last 10 years. In fact, Kevin Calderwood, the NY South mission president, is the church leader who really built up this event in the area all those years ago.

Hunter Daines drops off another bag of donations

Little did he know then that the giving model he perfected would be the same one that would benefit him and those he serves so many years later when faced with perhaps the most challenging assignment in his life as the leader in an area hit by the “storm of the century.”

Slowly the volunteers came. They picked up yellow “Helping Hands” vests, went to their posts and the work began. Volunteers then started coming in hoards and didn’t stop all night. The cars lined up from the drive-up and drop-off area, out the parking lot and down Hunter Mill Road. And the line never let up all night long.

Vehicles stuffed from floor to ceiling continued to be unloaded by teenagers who used their day off from school to gladly help. They rushed the items into the gymnasium where a woman from Rockville had positioned her wheelchair for the evening to direct the teenagers where to put their bags of donations.

Then, hundreds of volunteers hurriedly grabbed bags, tore them open and began the massive sorting.  When stacks of clothing became too high, they piled them neatly below the tables — infants, boys, girls, young women, young men, men and women. We saw boxes full of brand new towels, brand new coats. Families came together and every child had a job to do. The biggest challenge of the night was tracking down enough boxes for all the donations.

Becky Probst from Reston walked into the church and asked Trina what she could do to help. “Do you have a van?” she asked. “I have a van,” Becky said. “Then go find boxes — as many and as fast as you can.” Becky left and wondered where she could go that hadn’t all ready been cleaned out of boxes by other volunteers. Finally, she pulled her car over to the side of the road and said a prayer. “Help me find boxes,” she pled.  The name of a man she’d worked with on a different project years before popped into her head, and that led her to another man who owned a moving company. She emailed him and he responded promptly asking,”How many do you need and when?” Without hesitation, he offered all the boxes we needed AND trucks, and drivers.

In one night, we filled five 26-foot trucks with not an inch to spare and still had boxes we would send up later with another church’s load later in the week. We collected over $45,000 in $25 gift cards, had 400 or more volunteers receiving, sorting, boxing, loading, about 2,500 boxes, 10,000 diapers and over 100 bags of summer clothing we donated to the MS Foundation locally.

Channel 9 and Channel 7 news reporters joined us along with Sharon Bulova, Chairman of the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors. Everyone was astounded at what we were able to do in 48 hours.

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=10151186707268192

I put a collection bin on my porch and every time I returned home from an errand, I found more clothing. The bin overflowed, filled up my porch and the sidewalk leading up to the porch. The charitable goodness of my neighbors overwhelmed me. And, by far, the most frequent comment I heard was, “Thank you for giving me an opportunity to help!”

This is just one of my carloads

We had no idea what our community could do in a weekend but when motivated purely by love and a desire to help others, we learned they could do miracles.

When the five-truck caravan arrived in New York and the back doors were opened, I hope the people there felt the love behind every jacket, pair of pants and warm quilt.

And you know what the second most often asked question was?

“What else can I do?”

I got emails from people wanting to take time off work to drive up and help. One was from a church leader in Mount Vernon that said, “I have people chomping at the bit to get up there and help! Just send me the word when it’s time and they’ll be off.”

For now, it’s hard for the rescue workers to accommodate extra people. They can’t feed and house more bodies with an infrastructure so badly ruined, but soon they will have need for manpower, and I have no doubt those calls for help will be answered swiftly and generously.

One of our church leaders was once asked how we get members of the church to do so much service. He wanted to know how we get young men to postpone college for two years while they serve missions and why older couples leave their grandchildren and aging parents to serve humanitarian missions. How do you get people to do so much?

The simple answer was this: We ask.

I’ve seen the same thing in good people everywhere over the last week.

To everyone who helped with this emergency service event, thank you.

It’s amazing how much good we can do in the world when we just respond to a simple call for help even if it’s as small as a $25 gift card, a coat, or a warm pair of mittens for a cold set of hands.

I’m overwhelmed by the goodness around me.